Late-Night Smartphone Use Disrupts Your Sleep

For anyone who doubts the control their smartphone actually has over their daily and nightly habits needs to read this article from Psychology Today!

Cellphone Addiction

 
The average American spends 4.7 hours PER DAY on their smartphone! Add that to and 8 hour a day job, the time it takes to commute, eat and perform any other mandatory tasks required to live a normal life and that doesn’t leave much time for sleeping!

Sleep deprivation is getting to be an epidemic in America and the consequences are extreme. Late-night smartphone use has effectively been linked to depression, anxiety, reduced cognitive function and physical coordination. In other words – we are not our best and brightest during the day because of our obsession with cellphone use at night.

Because of our constant need to be connected, our minds are continually stimulated – and not always in a good way! While it is never too late in the day or night to receive happy news from friends and family, it is also never too late to get a good scathing from your boss or adversary either. Since only 17 percent of us shut off or silence our cellphones at night, we leave ourselves open to for business 24/7.

Sleep is not a luxury, it is a biological necessity in order to function properly and we are all – adults and adolescents alike, depriving ourselves of it.

Read the article and take the challenge – unplug yourself from the world for 24 hours. After the initial withdrawal symptoms have subsided, I am willing to bet that you will enjoy the peaceful serenity – and a good night’s sleep!

Perhaps the world would be a little nicer if we all just took the day off and got a good night’s sleep!

America Needs Sleep!

Many of us struggle to get enough sleep. We work longer hours to make less money, commute further to find better paying jobs and try to squeeze in enough time for “life” on the side.

It’s rough! Who on this planet is getting the recommended 8 hours anymore?

According to a Consumer Reports article, Americans spent an estimated $41 billion on sleep aids and remedies in 2015. Wow!

You can read the whole article here: Why Americans Can’t Sleep It will give you some great insight into just exactly how much of a sleep deprived nation we are!

Falling asleep and STAYING asleep has become the quest of an estimated 164 million Americans. If sleepless nights are a reoccurring theme for you, perhaps their video below will give you a few ideas to help you get some ZZzzzz’s!

Partial Sleep Deprivation Linked to Obesity

TiredA poor sleep or the lack of sleep can cause any number of health issues. While reading the latest copy of Sleep Review, I found this interesting article linking poor sleep habits to obesity. Everyone knows that you require a proper diet and exercise to maintain a healthy weight BUT…you also need a good night’s sleep!

People often don’t realize just how important sleep is to their health and productivity!

Evidence linking partial sleep deprivation to energy imbalance is relevant to weight gain prevention and weight loss promotion. A new study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dieteticsbases this finding on an extensive review of literature published over a 15-year period.

More than 35% of American adults are obese and more than 28% sleep less than 6 hours a night. While weight-loss strategies incorporate lifestyle changes focusing on diet and exercise, modifications in an individual’s daily routine, including sleep behaviors, can help manage weight.

“Various investigations, although diverse, indicate an effect of partial sleep deprivation on body weight management,” says lead investigator Sharon M. Nickols-Richardson, PhD, MD, professor, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park. “The intriguing relationship between partial sleep deprivation and excess adiposity makes partial sleep deprivation a factor of interest in body weight regulation, particularly in weight loss.”

The research team evaluated articles published between 1996 and 2011 to determine the role of partial sleep deprivation on energy balance and weight regulation. As part of its methodology, the team constructed a series of comparative tables detailing individual study populations, study designs, energy intake, energy expenditure, and measurements of the hormones ghrelin, leptin, insulin, glucose, and cortisol. Analysis of these characteristics identified a set of patterns, including reduced insulin sensitivity, increases in ghrelin, and decreases in leptin among partially sleep-deprived individuals. Changes in ghrelin and leptin influenced energy intake among the study populations.

“Changes in these hormones coinciding with an energy-reduced diet paired with changes in response to partial sleep deprivation may be expected to increase ghrelin and decrease leptin concentrations even further to promote hunger,” says Nickols-Richardson.

The paper calls for further research to determine the effects of sleep deprivation on body composition and substrate use and suggests evaluation of an individual’s sleep patterns combined with regular, sufficient sleep may benefit healthy weight management.